Telephone : 01993 622790/07835 169085

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Last  Updated: 20/03/2012

 

Sections:        Anchor

AnchorI. 3D Questions

II. Prescription Questions

AnchorIII. General Questions

 

AnchorI. 3D Questions

 

Anchor1. How do 3D displays in cinemas and TVs work?

Anchor2. What 3D systems are used these days?

Anchor3. What is the difference between the different 3D glasses?

Anchor4. How do I find out which system my local cinema uses?

Anchor5. What happens if I order the wrong ones by mistake?

Anchor6. What are 2D glasses?

Anchor7. Who are 2D glasses for?

Anchor8. Are the frames easily adjustable i.e. short ‘stalks’ for a smaller face or nose ‘rests’?

 

AnchorII. Prescription Questions

 

Anchor1. How do I give Optics 3D my prescription?

Anchor2. Can anyone buy prescription 3D glasses?

Anchor3. I do not know my prescription. How can I get prescription 3D glasses?

Anchor4. Can you supply bifocal lenses?

Anchor5. What if one eye prescription is different to the other  i.e. if someone has sight in only one eye?

Anchor6. Could 3D prescription glasses be made to the above specification?

 

AnchorIII. General Questions

 

Anchor1. How long does it take to deliver a pair of 3D prescription Glasses to the customer?

Anchor2. What is the company policy on returns?

Anchor3. What is the company policy on dispatch?

Anchor4. What is the procedure in the event of a complaint?

Anchor5. Are there any precautions that should be taken when wearing the glasses?

Anchor6. Where can I find the Terms and  Conditions on the Website?

Anchor7. How can one ensure that my personal details will remain safe and won’t be passed on to anyone else?

Anchor8. Are the lenses easily interchangeable?

Anchor9. Would there be a choice of frames and lenses?

 

AnchorI. 3D Questions

 

Anchor1. How do 3D displays in cinemas and TVs work?

 

3D displays all work by mimicking the binocular vision that most people have. They display two images, one for each eye in a way that they can be separated by some means. This normally involves the wearing of 3D glasses. The methods used are using coloured filters (anaglyph and Dolby 3D), linear and circular polarised light (Imax 3D, RealD and passive 3DTVs), active shutter systems (XpanD 3D and active 3DTVs) and glassless 3D systems (autostereoscopy). For further details read our Technology or Glossary pages.

 

Anchor2. What 3D systems are used these days?

 

The 3D systems used these days are Dolby 3D, Imax 3D, MasterImage 3D, RealD and XpanD 3D. Of these, RealD is the most common system. Imax 3D is the oldest system and Dolby 3D is the newest and arguably the best system. MasterImage, RealD and passive 3DTV all use the same glasses, with cicular polarisers. The glasses for the other systems will only work with those systems although it is possible to get glasses which work with both XpanD 3D and active 3DTVs.

 

Anchor3. What is the difference between the different 3D glasses?

 

There are five types of 3D glasses. These are anaglyphs, linear polarisers, circular polarisers, dichroic filters and active shutter glasses. Anaglyph glasses are the old fashioned glasses with different coloured lenses, typically red/cyan, although red/green, red/blue, green/magenta and amber/blue are also available. Linear polarisers are used by Imax 3D and some projector based home cinema systems. These are available with polarisers aligned at 0°/90° and at 45°/135°. Imax 3D use the 45°/135° glasses, the other glasses are used by some home cinema systems. Glasses with circular polarisers are used with RealD, MasterImage and passive 3DTVs. The same glasses will work with all three of these systems. The dichroic filters used by Dolby 3D let two sets of red, green and blue light through, one set for each eye. These glasses will only work in Dolby 3D cinemas. Active shutter 3D glasses have LCD shutter which synchronise with the display so that when the image for the right eye is displayed, the lens for the left eye darkens and visa versa. There are a number of different systems although universal ones are now available. In cinemas active shutter glasses are used with the XpanD 3D. They are also used with active 3DTVs. Optics 3D will sell anaglyph, linear (45°/135°), RealD and Dolby 3D glasses. Later this year we will sell 0°/90° linear glasses and we will look into selling active shutter 3D glasses.

 

Anchor4. How do I find out which system my local cinema uses?

 

Most cinemas use circular polarised light, mostly under the RealD brand name. However, you can find out for sure by asking at the cinema, or by the glasses, or you can visit our website on which we plan to list all of the 3D cinemas. If this does not help, then examine a pair of glasses supplied by the cinema. Polarisers used by RealD and Imax 3D cinemas have grey lenses. You can determine if it is linear or circular by tilting your head slightly when a film is playing. You will get double vision if the cinema is using linear, i.e. Imax 3D. Or you could look at yourself in the mirror whilst wearing the glasses. Close one eye and if you can see your open eye then they are Imax 3D glasses. If you can see your closed eye then they are RealD glasses. The mirror reverses the rotation of the circular polarised light. The light coming through one of the lenses gets circular polarised in one direction. When it reflects from the mirror its rotation reverses so that when it arrives back at the glasses they have the opposite spin and so the other lens lets it through. Dolby 3D glasses have silvery lenses, tend to be quite big and are normally retained by the cinema. XpanD 3D have big and heavy battery powered glasses and are also retained by the cinema.

 

Anchor5. What happens if I order the wrong ones by mistake?

 

We will be happy to replace them with the correct ones. We will only charge for the postage.

 

Anchor6. What are 2D glasses?

 

3D glasses have lenses which allow the viewer to see two slightly offset images, one for each eye. 2D glasses allow the viewer to see only one of these images, seen by both eyes. The effect of this is to turn a 3D film into a 2D film.

 

Anchor7. Who are 2D glasses for?

 

About 10% of the general population suffer form of adverse side effects from watching 3D films. These include headaches, nausea, vertigo and eyestrain. Such people can either watch these films with one eye shut, stay at home whilst their friends enjoy the film or just watch and suffer. For these people, 2D glasses are the answer. For example, my sister-in-law gets vertigo when she watches 3D films. However, her two sons love 3D films. For her, 2D glasses are the answer as these will allow her to accompany her two children to he cinema without suffering from vertigo.

 

Anchor8. Are the frames easily adjustable i.e. short ‘stalks’ for a smaller face or nose ‘rests’?

 

Unfortunately not. However, we do plan to make prescription 3D glasses for children next year.

 

AnchorII. Prescription Questions

 

Anchor1. How do I give Optics 3D my prescription?

 

There will be an online form that can be filled in with your prescription details. All the details should be found in your prescription form given to you by your optician. The only detail that you may have to measure or get measured is your pupil distance, the distance between your pupils. Alternatively, you will be able to scan your prescription form and upload it. 

 

Anchor2. Can anyone buy prescription 3D glasses?

 

We can not sell prescription glasses for people under 16 and those registered as blind or partially sighted. This is due to optician regulations (Opticians Act 1989, as amended by the Opticians Act 1989 (Amendment) Order 2005 - Section 27). Glasses for these people can be bought with an unglazed Rx insert, which can be taken to their local opticians for glazing. Specsavers, for example will glaze our insert for £39.

 

Anchor3. I do not know my prescription. How can I get prescription 3D glasses?

 

Again, unglazed inserts will be available.

 

Anchor4. Can you supply bifocal lenses?

 

Yes. We plan to offer a wide range of lens options, including bifocal and varifocal.

 

Anchor5. What if one eye prescription is different to the other?

 

As each pair of glasses will be made to order, your prescription details will be sent to Norvilles who will make the lenses for you.

 

Anchor6. What can I do if I make a mistake with my prescription?

 

Unfortunately, because the glazing of each insert is done individually and cannot be used by anyone else, we cannot accept returns unless the error was due to our mistake. However, we will be happy to reglaze them for you, the cost of which will be £20 including VAT.

 

AnchorIII. General Questions

 

Anchor1. How long does it take to deliver a pair of 3D prescription Glasses to the customer?

 

Non-prescription glasses should be made and sent by the end of the next working day. There may be short delays at certain times of year, but only day or two at most. Prescription glasses will normally take 3-7 days, but could be up to 14 days. Delivery time will depend on the method chosen and are shown below.

 

UK

Europe

Rest of the World

Second class Royal Mail

3-5 days

N/A

N/A

First Class Royal Mail

1-2 days

3 - 5 days

5 - 7 days

 

Anchor2. What is the company policy on returns?

 

We offer a free replacement or refund on any goods unwanted because of a fault on our part. We also accept returns for non-prescription glasses if returned in a resalable condition within 14 days, although you will be responsible for any postage costs. We do not accept returns for the prescription inserts as these are made to order and we cannot resell them.

 

Anchor3. What is the company policy on dispatch?

 

Goods can be sent via royal mail first and second class, recorded signed for, special delivery and airmail.  First and second class is only insured up to £46 in the event of loss or damage during transit so you may want to consider using special delivery, particularly for our multisystem glasses.

 

Anchor4. What is the procedure in the event of a complaint?

 

We will strive to meet or exceed our customers expectations. However, if we ever fail to meet these, we will do our best to rectify the situation in a timely fashion. We will offer a full refund on any goods which are faulty or do not meet your requirements due to our failure.

 

Anchor5. Are there any precautions that should be taken when wearing the glasses?

 

The 3D lenses do not absorb UV light and so should not be worn outdoors, particularly in sunny weather. Do not use 3D glasses as sunglasses.

 

Anchor6. Where can I find the Terms and  Conditions on the Website?

 

Our terms and conditions have not yet been written, but will be soon.

 

Anchor7. How can one ensure that my personal details will remain safe and won’t be passed on to anyone else?

 

We guarantee that we will not pass on any details to any third party without your express permission. The only third party we will routinely pass information to is Norvilles, our supplier of prescription lenses,and we will only pass on the information they need to make your prescription glasses to your prescription. We will keep all personal information encrypted and off-site.

 

Anchor8. Are the prescription inserts easily interchangable?

 

Yes they are. We use the same prescription insert for our entire range of glasses.

 

We use the same prescription inserts for all of our products and so will be fully interchangable. They can also be used with the Aqua sunglasses by Nannini.

 

Anchor9. Would there be a choice of frames and lenses?

 

We will have two product lines, sold under RxMono3D and RxMulti3D brand names. Each will be available with lenses which support RealD, MasterImage 3D, Imax 3D, sunglasses and eventually Dolby 3D and various anaglyph colours. The RxMono3D frames are available in black, whereas the RxMulti3D frames are available in black, blue, cyan, green, pink, red, transparent, white and violet.

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